• The Politics of the New Welfare State
    Over the last two decades, mature welfare states have undergone a profound transformation. Social polices have taken up new functions, such as bringing non working people back to employment and helping families reconcile work and familiy life. We have also witnessed stronger integration between social and employment policy, and increasingly, education. These developments have taken place against the background of changing institutions e.g. at the EU level) and social structures, most notably with the emergence of new social risks and new cleavages (insider/outsider). This project aims to investigate how these changes in the substance and in the context of European welfare states are modifying the politics of social policy
  • The redesigning of the internal boundaries of the western European welfare states
    Mature welfare states were built over long periods of time, and consist in the juxtaposition of schemes catering for groups of beneficiaries defined by the cause of joblessness (unemployment, invalidity, sickness). With the reorientation of welfare states towards activation and the diffusion of New Public Management techniques over the last decade, this fragmentation has emerged as a key problem in a majority of OECD countries. Accordingly, many OECD countries have initiated reforms aimed at re-organising and better co-ordinating their social security systems for working-age people. The project is divided in two parts. A first part aims to examine the diversity of “coordination initiatives” across European countries and identify the determinants that may account for it. The second part analyses the responses to the fragmentation problem adopted in the 26 Swiss Cantons.
  • The politics of reform of continental European welfare states
    The principal aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the similar social protection institutions that characterise Bismarckian welfare states - eligibility based on work, earnings-related benefits, contribution financing and devolved para-state management - on the politics, timing and content of social reforms over the last 25 years. The project will systematically compare patterns of reform in Bismarckian welfare states/programmes, aiming to explain commonalities and differences, and to understand and draw out the implications of innovations that have been introduced in Bismarckian systems in recent years
  • Activation in western European welfare states
    The objective of this project is to compare the adaptation of national welfare state to the increasingly strong expectation that social policy contributes to the reintegration of beneficiaries into the labour market. Policy areas covered include unemployment insurance and assistance, invalidity insurance, social assistance, sickness insurance in Germany, France, Sweden, the Netherlands, Switzerland the UK and the US
  • Innovative Social Policies for Inclusive and Resilient Labour Markets in Europe
    The main goal of the INSPIRES project is to contribute to the resilience and inclusiveness of labour markets in European countries. The benefits of INSPIRES are manifold due to the fact that combating unemployment and promoting inclusion have always been an important policy goal for the European Union. For this purpose, the project will deliver evidence on the emergence and impact of innovations in labour markets, employment and social policies by analyzing large-scale datasets like the European Labour Force Survey, EU-SILC, LIS, and global data provided by ILO and OECD and new qualitative and quantitative data.
  • The Governance of Supplementary pension schemes in Europe
    The project compares the varying shift towards and the particular governance modes of supplementary private pensions across Europe and aims at investigating the different impact on individual participation in private pensions during work-life and on the subsequent income situation in old age. It will study how different social groups (such as the full-time versus part-time employed, normal versus atypical workers) are insured through supplementary pensions, how their stake-holder interests are represented in such funds, and how their retirement income will be affected. Countries covered include: Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, and the UK.
  • Adapting mature welfare states to new structures of social risk
    The objective of this project is to identify the factors and the mechanisms that account for the development of policies that provide coverage against new social risks (NSR) in advanced welfare states. NSR are understood as individual level welfare losses associated with the socio-economic transformations that have brought postindustrial societies into existence: deindustrialisation, the massive entry of women into the labour force, increased family instability and the destandardisation of employment. New social risks include long-term unemployment, being a working poor, being a single parent, facing difficulties in reconciling work and family life, and having insufficient social security coverage
  • Reconciling work and welfare in Europe, Network of excellence financed under FP 6
    The paramount objective of RECWOWE is to create a new and durable and tightly integrated European research network, overcoming the chronic fragmentation and dispersion of existing research into the areas of employment and labour markets on the one hand, and welfare regimes, on the other. At present these two domains are often investigated in almost total isolation from each other. Their connection will vastly improve our understanding of recent and current changes in the crucial relationship and interface between the two domains. The ultimate aim is to contribute to reconciling work and welfare (hence the acronym RECWOWE), and thereby maintaining and renewing the European social model, briefly characterised as the capacity for combining strong economic growth and competitiveness with a commitment to a high level and quality of employment and social protection
  • The redesigning of the internal boundaries of the welfare European welfare states
    Mature welfare states were built over long periods of time, and consist in the juxtaposition of schemes catering for groups of beneficiaries defined by the cause of joblessness (unemployment, invalidity, sickness). With the reorientation of welfare states towards activation and the diffusion of New Public Management techniques over the last decade, this fragmentation has emerged as a key problem in a majority of OECD countries. Accordingly, many OECD countries have initiated reforms aimed at re-organising and better co-ordinating their social security systems for working-age people. The project is divided in two parts. A first part aims to examine the diversity of “coordination initiatives” across European countries and identify the determinants that may account for it. The second part analyses the responses to the fragmentation problem adopted in the 26 Swiss Cantons.
  • Social netowrks and access to employment for unemployed people
    The objective of this project is to investigate the role that informal social networks can play in facilitating labour market re-entry for newly unemployed people. The project includes an intervention (information session on the importance of networks in job searching) that will by assessed in a quasi-experimental setting. In addition, about 4,000 unemployed people are questioned concerning their informal networks and followed over a period of 12 months. In this way, we hope to be able to identify the types of network and network usage that are most likely to lead to a new job. The project is mostly financed by the SNF through the Lausanne based NCCR "LIVES". Additional funds are provided by the SECO, and the field work is carried out in collaboration with the Employment service of the Cantoin of Vaud